Terri Meyer Boake, BES, BArch, MArch, LEED AP
Professor School of Architecture University of Waterloo
email: tboake@uwaterloo.ca

 

Bullitt Center, Seattle, Washington

 

Arch 125:
Principles of Environmental Design

Fall 2016:
Course Home Page

 

course outline

updated Wednesday, November 30, 2016 9:16 PM
last updated November 30, 2016 9:16 PM

Course Description :

An introduction to the environmental aspects of architectural design and to an analysis of the form that landscapes take and the processes and ideals leading to those forms. The relationship of the landscape to microclimates and building environments. Topics of discussion include environmental concepts and influences on design, site planning, landscape, sustainability, solar geometry, embodied energy, climatic influences and microclimates, passive heating, passive cooling and carbon neutral design basics.

“Since antiquity man has reacted to his environment, using his faculties to develop techniques and technologies, whether to back bread or to make brick, in such internal psychological balance with nature that humanity historically lived attuned to the environment. Man’s creations were natural when built of the materials offered by the landscape…Every advance in technology has been directed toward man’s mastery of his environment. Until very recently, however, man always maintained a certain balance between his bodily and spiritual being and the external world. Disruption of this balance may have a detrimental effect on man, genetically, physiologically or psychologically. And however fast technology advances, however radically the economy changes, all change must be related to the rate of change of man himself. The abstractions of the technologist and the economist must be continually pulled down to Earth by the gravitational force of human nature…”
Hassan Fathy, Natural Energy and Vernacular Architecture

“Being green should not be a bragging point, it should be the way we all act in our everyday lives and work and play places.  If the world was shrunk to the size of a basketball, the biosphere - the zone of air, water and land where all life exists - would be thinner than a layer of varnish.  That's it.  It's finite and fixed and cannot grow.  Humanity has exploded in number, technological musclepower, consumptive appetite and a global economy and we are now altering the chemical, physical and biological features of the planet on a geological scale.  The challenge is finding ways to live in a truly sustainable way in our home, the biosphere.”
David Suzuki 

Teaching Assistant: Sarah Donaldson

Log-in to LEARN: here

 

Schedule of Classes: Wednesdays, 2:00pm to 5:00pm. ARC 1101

Office Hours: Tuesdays, 1pm to 2pm, Wednesdays 11am to 2pm, ARC 3012

NOTE: USE OF LAPTOPS IS NOT PERMITTED IN THIS CLASS. PLEASE TAKE NOTES IN NOTEBOOKS. THESE WILL BE PERMITTED FOR USE IN QUIZZES.

IF ATTENDANCE IS STELLAR, POWERPOINTS AND SLIDE PRESENTATIONS WILL BE POSTED. IF ATTENDANCE SLIPS, THEY WILL NOT BE POSTED

ATTENDANCE IS MANDATORY. MISSING MORE THAN TWO CLASSES WITHOUT A SERIOUSLY DOCUMENTED EXCUSE WILL CONSITUTE FAILURE OF THE COURSE.

This course outline will be updated with the weekly readings as the term progresses. Please check it weekly! Informative articles will be posted to the course Facebook page. Please Like it at https://www.facebook.com/BoakeTech/

1

Sept. 14

RADICAL GREEN - COURSE INTRODUCTION

SOLVING THE PROBLEM NATURALLY

“We must begin by taking note of the countries and climates in which homes are to be built if our designs for them are to be correct.  Once type of house seems appropriate for Egypt, another for Spain…one still different for Rome…It is obvious that design for homes ought to conform to diversities of climate.”
Vitruvius, Architect 1st century BC

powerpoint

Environmental Footprint Reading Assignment Part 1 (1 MB)
Environmental Footprint Reading Assignment Part 2 (1 MB)

Project #1: Ecological Footprint Analysis (10%)
Handed out

Students will examine the ‘’Ecological Footprint’’ model and evaluate their own footprint using a web based calculator.
project outline

2

Sept. 21

Project #1: Hand in printed copy at the beginning of class. Late assignments are awarded zero marks.

CLIMATE AND HUMAN COMFORT
Buildings need to provide much more than shelter. They need to keep us comfortable and this is a direct function of our regional climate. A discussion of various climate zones and their relationship to human comfort as impacts the design of the building enclosure or "third skin". Specific architectural responses to climate.

Vernacular Architecture:
Regionality in architectural design. Specific vernacular responses to climatic condition. The impact of translating climate specific responses.

READ:
Lechner. Chapter 1.

Course notes:
images/course_pdf/125-Ch2.pdf

images/course_pdf/125-ch1.pdf

Primitive Architecture and Climate: James Marston Fitch and Daniel P. Branch

Designing for Diversity: http://www.archdaily.com/175518/the-plato-effect-in-architecture-designing-for-human-diversity/

powerpoint

DRIVERS OF CHANGE:

There are numerous factors that are driving the change in our climate that may not seem obvious. Many are socially and technologically based. For this assignment the class is making a combined/expanded Pecha Kucha style presentation.

see outline

3

Sept. 28

Quiz #1 - Solving the Problem Naturally - 5%

CLIMATE AND THE ENVIRONMENT: INTRODUCTION TO BUILDING SCIENCE
Understanding the architectural creation of sublime comfort.
The effects of solar geometry, siting, and geo-regional characteristics on conceptual building design
Thermal considerations; heat gain and loss; air and vapour barriers


READ:
Canadian Wood Frame House Construction: (link in Arch 172 course page)
Healthy Housing: p. 13-18
Vapour and Air Barriers p. 271-278
Thermal Insulation p. 255-270
Ventilation p. 283-290
Course Notes: Building Science link

powerpoint

4

Oct. 5

Drivers of Change Powerpoint - submit to LEARN by 9am

 

View Drivers of Change presentation on YouTube

ORIENTATION, SOLAR GEOMETRY AND SHADING:
The importance of building orientation as it affects solar exposure. Basic principles. Students learn how to use sun angle data to plot shadows, determine solar gain, understand sun penetration into buildings for various geographical regions and for differing seasons. Students will learn how to use a heliodon.

READ:
Lechner. Chapter 6

Architecture and Global Warming: www.architectureweek.com

Course notes:
images/course_pdf/125-Ch6.pdf
images/course_pdf/125-Ch7.pdf
please refer to course notes homepage for links to the solar templates
crsnotes.html

August/April solar geometry chart 1.0MB link

Shading (extra information not shown in class) 1.4MB pdf

shading chart for June 21 43degreesN
shading chart for March 21 43degreesN
shading chart for December 21 43degreesN
shading chart for September 21 43degreesN
shading information for all latitudes
 

powerpoint

5

Oct. 19

Quiz #2 - Solar Geometry and Shading Strategies - 5%

DRIVERS OF CHANGE PRESENTATION

Please take notes during the film and Drivers of Change presentation. There will be a question on the content on the next quiz.

6

Oct. 26

PASSIVE DESIGN - HEATING STRATEGIES:
An examination of passive strategies for heating. In depth look at case studies and application procedures. Direct gain vs. indirect gain systems.

READ:
Lechner. Chapter 7

passive heating powerpoint

PASSIVE DESIGN - COOLING STRATEGIES:
An examination of passive strategies for cooling. In depth look at case studies and application procedures. Heat avoidance and natural ventilation strategies.

READ:
Lechner. Chapter 10

passive cooling powerpoint

7

Nov. 2

 

ENVIRONMENTAL SITE DESIGN:
An examination of the residential and smaller scale site with respect to building placement, sun penetration, landscape elements/choices, wind, services. The effect of material choices on the small "microclimate" that is developed around our buildings.
Keyword: Microclimate

READ:
Lechner. Chapter 11

environmental sites powerpoint

Project #2: The Light Box (20%)
handed out

This project is to be done in groups of 2 students

project outline

Project #3: The Smoke Box (20%)
handed out

This project is to be done in groups of 2 students.

project outline

8

Nov. 9

Quiz #3 - Passive Heating and Cooling - 5% + question on DOC

For the Drivers of Change question, this is the question: Describe 5 key points that you learned from the Drivers of Change presentations. You will need to be very specific for these to count – so not just a 5 word type answer. This question is to show that you were paying attention. Feel free to prepare your answer ahead of the quiz, however, keep in mind that the quiz is 15 minutes long and this is one of 3 questions. It should be no longer than a half of a page in length.

INTERSTITIAL SPACE - DESIGNING ECO-FRIENDLY URBAN RESIDENTIAL ZONES:
A study of residential neighbourhoods, with emphasis on multi-family building types, and the design and sizing of the "spaces inbetween". Emphasis on access to natural light, greenspace, privacy zones.

READ:
Lechner. Chapter 11.

Course Notes:
images/course_pdf/125-Ch6.pdf
images/course_pdf/125-Ch7.pdf
the 4 key solar charts are also available for download on the course notes homepage link

interstitial space powerpoint

interstitial space slideshow

9

Nov. 16

Project #2: Lightbox Presentations and Seminar

Each group of students will present their lightbox.

Please note that each person needs to speak. Nobody gets to be mute.

10 FRIDAY

Nov. 18

Project #3: Smokebox Presentations and Seminar

Each group of students will present their smokebox.

THIS TAKES PLACE IN THE WOOD SHOP.

PLEASE WEAR BLACK TO CUT DOWN ON REFLECTIONS FOR THE SMOKEBOX PHOTOS/VIDEO!

11

Nov. 23

MODELING AND DATA TO HELP YOU DESIGN

There is only so far that you can go with "gut feelings" when you are designing for the climate. Each site is quite unique and has its own potentials and problems. We will look at some tools that can assist with design decisions.

understanding the Psychrometric Chart

Download Climate Consultant Software (PC or Mac, free)

Climate Consultant

Please download and install Climate Consultant: http://www.energy-design-tools.aud.ucla.edu/

READ:
Lechner. Chapter 5. Climate

Article: It's Not Easy Being Green

12

Nov. 30

INTRODUCTION TO LEED: LEADERSHIP IN ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN

In order to be more critical and accurate in the application of environmental strategies, various systems have been developed to certify the performance of buildings. We will end the term by looking at the LEED system as it is the most popular. For Arch 126 in the winter term you will be writing a research paper on a LEED certified building of your choice. The choice of building and the essay outline will be given out today so that you might have a chance to visit your case study building over the end of term break.

REFERENCE:

US Green Building Corporation Website: http://www.usgbc.org/

Canadian Green Building Corporation Website: https://www.cagbc.org/

Link to the LEED excel spreadsheet for the LEED V4 system.

Link to the LEED V4 Reference Guide

LEED powerpoint

Dec. 22

Project #4 due at 4 pm to my office #3012

Project outline


Reference Texts:

Required:
Lechner: Heating Cooling Lighting

Any edition is fine. Please double check page numbers for readings if using an older edition.

Evaluation:

Evaluation will be based both on the formal/technical execution of the projects, as well as the seminar presentation of material and contributions to the discussions.

Late Penalties:
Projects or assignments submitted after the due date or due time will be penalized 5% per calendar day of lateness, with no maximum.
Projects submitted more than 5 days late will be awarded a grade of zero.

Course Evaluation:

Quizzes: 15% - 3 @ 5%

Drivers of Change Assignment: 15%
Project 1: Environmental Footprint 10%
Project 2: Lightbox 20%
Project 3: Smokebox 20%
Project 4: Solar Analysis Project 20%

Total: 100%

 

 

Avoidance of Academic Offenses

Academic Integrity: To create and promote a culture of academic integrity, the behaviour of all members of the University of Waterloo is based on honesty, trust, fairness, respect and responsibility. www.uwaterloo.ca/academicintegrity/

Grievance:
 A student who believes that a decision affecting some aspect of his/her university life has been unfair or unreasonable may have grounds for initiating a grievance. Read Policy 70 - Student Petitions and Grievances, Section 4, http://www.adm.uwaterloo.ca/infosec/Policies/policy70.htm

Discipline:
A student is expected to know what constitutes academic integrity, to avoid committing academic offenses, and to take responsibility for his/her actions. A student who is unsure whether an action constitutes an offense, or who needs help in learning how to avoid offenses (e.g., plagiarism, cheating) or about “rules” for group work/collaboration should seek guidance from the course professor, academic advisor, or the Undergraduate Associate Dean. When misconduct has been found to have occurred, disciplinary penalties will be imposed under Policy 71 – Student Discipline. For information on categories of offenses and types of penalties, students should refer to Policy 71 - Student Discipline, http://www.adm.uwaterloo.ca/infosec/Policies/policy71.htm

Appeals:
A student may appeal the finding and/or penalty in a decision made under Policy 70 - Student Petitions and Grievances (other than regarding a petition) or Policy 71 - Student Discipline if a ground for an appeal can be established. Read Policy 72 - Student Appeals, http://www.adm.uwaterloo.ca/infosec/Policies/policy72.htm

Note for students with disabilities: The Office for Persons with Disabilities (OPD), located in Needles Hall, Room 1132, collaborates with all academic departments to arrange appropriate accommodations for students with disabilities without compromising the academic integrity of the curriculum. If you require academic accommodations to lessen the impact of your disability, please register with the OPD at the beginning of each academic term. Once registered with OPD, please meet with the professor, in confidence, during office hours to discuss your needs.

 

 

updated Wednesday, November 30, 2016 9:16 PM

last updated November 30, 2016 9:16 PM